Designing Music NOW

Dedicated to the Craft of Creating Music for Video Games and Interactive Media

NEWS – JunkieXL Brass Library – Crowdsourcing A Wishlist

NEWS – JunkieXL Brass Library – Crowdsourcing A Wishlist

JunkieXL, composer famous for Mad Max Fury Road, Tomb Raider, and Superman Vs. Batman as well as an impressive list of video game credits such as Madden, Darkspore and Saints Row (full list here) is working on a new sample library for brass.  He is seeking feedback...

Adaptive Music with Elias – Tutorial Series – Part 1

Adaptive Music with Elias – Tutorial Series – Part 1

Adaptive music has been a staple of AAA dynamic game audio for more than two decades, when it was used in LucasArts games such as Monkey Island 2. Featuring the in-house iMUSE music system, combined with MIDI data, and downloadable sound banks, this game achieved a...

NATURE OF ALL THINGS – A World Music Orchestra Case Study

NATURE OF ALL THINGS – A World Music Orchestra Case Study

Introduction We live in a time where now more than ever, we can get a deep insight into how people from around the world live their lives, meet their struggles, make their art. As a pianist and film, TV and games composer, this potential to take those influences and...

Audio Design for Interactive Narrative VR Experiences

Audio Design for Interactive Narrative VR Experiences

Introduction Audio is important in many forms of storytelling. George Lucas once said “Sound is half of the experience” It is even truer when it comes to Virtual Reality because the sound in VR can directly affect the immersion of the experience. For example, if we...

From Linear to Adaptive – How a Film Composer fell in love with Adaptive Music

From Linear to Adaptive – How a Film Composer fell in love with Adaptive Music

At the Game Developers Conference (GDC) in San Francisco, I was introduced to the adaptive music tool for game composers, Elias. They showed me the newly introduced MIDI capabilities, and I began to think about how it compared to other adaptive music systems I had learned, such as FMOD and WWISE. I was surprised to see a software 100% made for composers and had to check it out. I’m a classically trained film composer, who recently entered the game industry. The biggest struggle for a composer, whether he writes for film or games, is to figure out moments and moods and how to best portray them in music. Game composers have had to improvise and figure ways or preventing their tracks from sounding boring and repetitive. Middleware such as FMOD and WWISE were a great start down this path, but Elias seems to me to be the evolution of adaptive game music. In this first article in a series on adaptive music, I will explore Elias and my first impressions of it.